Mesothelioma or Asbestos Question?





Is Asbestos Still Found in the United States?

Asbestos is a flexible, fire-retardant, and insulating material that was used heavily in industries ranging from ship building to automotive production to home building as late as the 1960s. Once the dangers of asbestos became known, however, its use dropped dramatically, and was banned in most industries. However, this does not mean that asbestos cannot be found anymore, and unfortunately, people across the United States are exposed to asbestos every day.

If you or your loved one is suffering a medical condition because of asbestos exposure, you may be eligible for financial compensation from the party responsible for your exposure. To learn more about the medical and legal options available to you as a victim of asbestos exposure, fill out the contact form at the top of this page today.

Products Containing Asbestos

Especially in older homes and buildings, asbestos-containing building materials may not have been removed. It is expensive and dangerous to remove asbestos, and many people are aware that they have asbestos-containing products in their buildings, but choose to not remove it. The following are common household materials that may contain asbestos:

  • Wall insulation
  • Roofing materials
  • Vinyl flooring
  • Counter tops
  • Kitchen appliances

Other products in use in the United States that may still contain asbestos fibers include the following:

  • Brake pads
  • Battery separators
  • Pipeline wrap
  • Vehicle clutches
  • Cement pipes

Contact Us

Asbestos is a dangerous substance, and no one should have to suffer from unknowing exposure to asbestos fibers. Sadly, Mesothelioma and other asbestos-related diseases are not uncommon. If you or your loved one is suffering from one of these conditions, learn more about the options available to you by contacting the Mesothelioma & Asbestos Help Center today.

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