Mesothelioma or Asbestos Question?





Pleurectomy

When a patient is diagnosed with cancer, doctors will typically create a treatment plan involving the conventional treatment methods of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. These treatments are considered standard because they have proven to be most effective in fighting cancer. With mesothelioma, however, survival rates are low. Thus, doctors typically use treatment methods such as surgery more to lengthen a patient’s lifespan rather than to completely eradicate the disease.

Surgery works to remove a patient’s cancerous tumor or tumors so that they can no longer metastasize. Removal can also help prevent the tumors from pressing on other areas of the body and causing pain. With mesothelioma, there are several different surgical options that doctors might use, including a pleurectomy.

Pleurectomy and Mesothelioma

Mesothelioma is a very specific type of cancer that attacks the cells lining the body, called the epithelial cells. The epithelial cells make up the mesothelium, or the lining of the organs and body cavities. This lining secretes a special lubricating fluid to prevent friction or chafing from injuring the internal organs. During a pleurectomy, doctors remove the portion of cancerous lining from the lungs and the thoracic (chest) cavity.

How Pleurectomy Works

With this surgery, an incision is made in the chest above the tumor or diseased area. The surgeon will then remove the unhealthy tissue lining the outer surface of the lungs as well as any diseased lining in the thoracic cavity. Sometimes, surgeons can also then extract an unhealthy portion of actual lung tissue.

For More Information

If you have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, it is important that you understand all of your treatment options before you agree to a treatment plan. To learn more about mesothelioma surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation, please fill out the contact form located at the top of the Mesothelioma Resource Center page today.

Pleurectomy

When a patient is diagnosed with cancer, doctors will typically create a treatment plan involving the conventional treatment methods of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. These treatments are considered standard because they have proven to be most effective in fighting cancer. With mesothelioma, however, survival rates are low. Thus, doctors typically use treatment methods such as surgery more to lengthen a patient’s lifespan rather than to completely eradicate the disease.

Surgery works to remove a patient’s cancerous tumor or tumors so that they can no longer metastasize. Removal can also help prevent the tumors from pressing on other areas of the body and causing pain. With mesothelioma, there are several different surgical options that doctors might use, including a pleurectomy.

Pleurectomy and Mesothelioma

Mesothelioma is a very specific type of cancer that attacks the cells lining the body, called the epithelial cells. The epithelial cells make up the mesothelium, or the lining of the organs and body cavities. This lining secretes a special lubricating fluid to prevent friction or chafing from injuring the internal organs. During a pleurectomy, doctors remove the

Pleurectomy

When a patient is diagnosed with cancer, doctors will typically create a treatment plan involving the conventional treatment methods of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. These treatments are considered standard because they have proven to be most effective in fighting cancer. With mesothelioma, however, survival rates are low. Thus, doctors typically use treatment methods such as surgery more to lengthen a patient’s lifespan rather than to completely eradicate the disease.

Surgery works to remove a patient’s cancerous tumor or tumors so that they can no longer metastasize. Removal can also help prevent the tumors from pressing on other areas of the body and causing pain. With mesothelioma, there are several different surgical options that doctors might use, including a pleurectomy.

Pleurectomy and Mesothelioma

Mesothelioma is a very specific type of cancer that attacks the cells lining the body, called the epithelial cells. The epithelial cells make up the mesothelium, or the lining of the organs and body cavities. This lining secretes a special lubricating fluid to prevent friction or chafing from injuring the internal organs. During a pleurectomy, doctors remove the portion of cancerous lining from the lungs and the thoracic (chest) cavity.

How Pleurectomy Works

With this surgery, an incision is made in the chest above the tumor or diseased area. The surgeon will then remove the unhealthy tissue lining the outer surface of the lungs as well as any diseased lining in the thoracic cavity. Sometimes, surgeons can also then extract an unhealthy portion of actual lung tissue.

For More Information

If you have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, it is important that you understand all of your treatment options before you agree to a treatment plan. To learn more about mesothelioma surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation, please fill out the contact form located at the top of the Mesothelioma Resource Center page today.

portion of cancerous lining from the lungs and the thoracic (chest) cavity.

How Pleurectomy Works

With this surgery, an incision is made in the chest above the tumor or diseased area. The surgeon will then remove the unhealthy tissue lining the outer surface of the lungs as well as any diseased lining in the thoracic cavity. Sometimes, surgeons can also then extract an unhealthy portion of actual lung tissue.

For More Information

If you have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, it is important that you understand all of your treatment options before you agree to a treatment plan. To learn more about mesothelioma surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation, please fill out the contact form located at the top of the Mesothelioma Resource Center page today.

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