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Employees at Virginia nuclear power plant possibly exposed to asbestos

According to reports from the State Department of Labor, contract employees at the Surry nuclear power plant were exposed to asbestos in April while cutting pipes on the plant.

Before the job began, safety officials said that there would not be asbestos on any of the pipes and if there was, they would clearly labeled. Later, asbestos, a known carcinogen, was found on the clothing of a dozen of the employees.

The amount of asbestos that the workers were exposed to is not known because equipment to examine the air quality was not on the site when the job was being done. An investigation into the plant’s parent company, Dominion Virginia Power, remains underway at this time.

If you or a loved one has been exposed to asbestos without your knowledge or without the correct safety wear, contact us or visit our website today for more information at www.mesothelioma-asbestoshelp.org.

The different types of mesothelioma

Mesothelioma is a rare type of cancer that primarily affects the lining of the lung, but can also affect other organs. Mesothelioma is almost always caused by exposure to asbestos particles which occurs when asbestos is disturbed and becomes airborne.

There are approximately 3,000 cases of mesothelioma diagnosed each year in the United States. Because the disease has a long latency period, the average age of  mesothelioma patient is 62 and the life expectancy is generally less than a year.

The three types include Pleural, Peritoneal, Pericardial mesothelioma. The most common form of the cancer is Pleural and occurs when the cancer develops in the lining of the lung. Nearly 75 percent of the cases are this form.

Peritoneal accounts for nearly 20 percent of the cases and occurs when the cancer develops in the lining of the abdominal cavity. The last is Pericardial mesothelioma and it is very rare. It accounts for only 5 percent of cases and occurs when cancer develops in the lining of the heart.

If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with mesothelioma and you would like to learn more about this disease, contact us with any questions or visit our website today http://www.mesothelioma-asbestoshelp.org.

Landlord cited after asbestos violations

A landlord is facing charges after he allegedly hired homeless workers to help tear down a Lake Avenue home that was contaminated with asbestos.

It has also been said in the case that the man not only handled asbestos tile the wrong way,  but he reused some of the tiles in another project. The man owns 13 properties in the area.

The owner allegedly did this in order to avoid paying a $200,000 bill to take down the asbestos legally. He is currently charged with two felony counts of intentionally handling toxic materials and numerous counts of air pollution without permits.

Asbestos violations are very serious because the inhalation of asbestos particles are primary cause of mesothlelioma, a rare form of lung cancer. If you have been exposed to asbestos and would like to learn more, contact us or visit our site today at www.mesothelioma-asbestoshelp.org.

Mass. school cited for improperly removing asbestos

The Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection has issued a Massachusetts school a citation for improperly removing asbestos.

According to the Boston Globe, during the asbestos project that occurred in 2009, the cleaning staff removed asbestos tiles by just throwing them into normal trashcans outside.

This occurred while the students were on the campus. It has been said that teachers and students were not exposed to the material, but it is also unknown whether the staff had protective masks on. The containers were then found behind the school.

If you or a loved one has been exposed to asbestos after it was improperly removed, contact us in order to learn more about the material.

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